Het Loo
As opposed to Renaissance and Baroque gardens in other European countries, the typical feature of Dutch gardens is the lack of artificial and natural alternations of natural relief. The other distinct feature is the appearance of water canal(s), which divides the interior of the garden as well as it is its border and serves as communication route. Due to fact, that whole Holland is quite small country, also its gardens are of smaller areas comparing to e.g. nearby France.

The flat terrain caused also the relatively poor equipment of these gardens with such elements as walls, stairs, ramps and grottos. At the same time, the various types of topiary works and sophisticated forms of plant parterres was in fashion.

One of the most famous Dutch baroque gardens, existing till today, is located in Het Loo (Apeldoorn). It was created in the end of XVII century around the palace of Wilhelm III and was designed by Daniel Marot. The layout of this garden is based on the axis perpendicular to the main palace buildings. The beds of formal flower parterres near the palace are separated by the water canal from grass parterres in second part of the garden, ended with the half-oval gallery.

Additionally there are two smaller gardens, attached to the buildings of the palace: the Garden of the King and on the opposite site – the Garden of the Queen.

During XIX century, the garden was enlarged and transformed into landscape garden. In the second part of XX century, the garden in Het Loo underwent the big restoration works and obtained once again its historical Baroque character.








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Het Loo
main axis
Queen's garden
main stairs
Queen's garden
Queen's garden
Queen's garden
Queen's garden
Queen's garden
Queen's garden
Queen's garden
Queen's garden
Het Loo
Het Loo
Het Loo
Het Loo
Venus fountain
Het Loo
Het Loo
Water canal
Het Loo
Water canal
Het Loo
Het Loo
Het Loo
Het Loo
Het Loo
Het Loo
Het Loo
Het Loo